Knowing when to hold your ground—and get what you want.

There's a difference between fighting for what you want in your relationship and being in direct control of your partner, demanding that he or she change, says Real.


Rebecca WebberRebecca Webber spent the past five years on staff at Glamour magazine, where she reported, wrote, and edited everything from front-of-book service pieces to investigative features. She has also worked as a freelance reporter and writer for more than eight years, with recent stories published in Glamour, Parade, Prevention, and Psychology Today. She has a BA from Georgetown University and an MS from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Editor: Nadeem Noor


Firmly stand up for your wants and needs in a relationship. "Most people don't have the skill to speak up for and fight for what they want in a relationship," he observes. "They don't speak up, which preserves the love but builds resentment. Resentment is a choice; living resentfully means living unhappily. Or they speak up—but are not very loving." Or they just complain.

The art to speaking up, he says, is to transform a complaint into a request. Not "I don't like how you're talking to me," but  "Can you please lower your voice so I can hear you better?" If you're trying to get what you want in a relationship, notes Real, it's best to keep it positive and future-focused.

 

Courtesy: Psychologytoday.com

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